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Changing Nature, The Green Show – The Cannon Beach Gallery

Changing Nature, The Green Show – The Cannon Beach Gallery

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Changing Nature April 3 – April 26, 2015

Artist Reception: April 4, 5 – 7pm

Exhibit Sponsor: Recology Western Oregon

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"Bug Community" by Tara

“Bug Community” by Tara

“Bug Community,” Tara Doherty, painting on found wood.

learning to build

“Learning to Build’, Lloyd McMullen

“Learning to Build’, Lloyd McMullen. The mixed media pod includes a small bird and bird nest inside. Materials: Pod: Burnt wire frame, sewing patterns, flex gel and acrylic mediums. Birds nest: acrylic mediums, sushi bowl, actual bird’s nest; with bird made from Christmas light bulb, wire, acrylic/mediums, peeled paint, sewing patterns.

 

The Cannon Beach Gallery will be featuring an installation during the month of April that will feature well known Cannon Beach artist, Steve McLeod along with central Oregon artists Lloyd McMullen and Tara Doherty. The installation, Changing Nature, expands upon the concept of the “butterfly effect”: that every action no matter how small has global consequences. An Artist Reception on April 4, from 5 – 7 p.m. will include a short talk by the artists. The show is on display from April 3 –April 26, 2015. The Cannon Beach Gallery is located Midtown Cannon Beach at 1064 S. Hemlock Street in Midtown, Cannon Beach. Cannon Beach artist, Steve McLeod will display assemblages and mobiles constructed of tsunami debris. McLeod is known equally for his background in fine arts and as an avid beach comber and collector of lost cargo that has fallen off of passing container ships. His work is a reflection on the life of the ocean and how it is being impacted by modern plastics. McMullen and Doherty create installations together that tell stories about what it means to be a part of the world today as artists who work green. They are collectively interested in the chaos theory, known as the butterfly effect, which describes how a small change at one place can result in huge differences in a later state. The name of the effect, coined by Edward Lorenz, is derived from theoretical example of the details of a hurricane (exact time of formation, exact path taken) being influenced by the flapping of the wings of a distant butterfly several weeks earlier. The installation of mixed media work will heavily incorporate found objects and cast off materials, to suggest a small biosphere investigating that theory: every action no matter how small has a global consequence. Large cocoons and nests made from up-cycled materials will hang from gallery walls, casting shadows around the pieces. A wall of two-dimensional icons of flying creatures will personify the transitory nature of the natural world. The use of transferred images, found objects, rusty metal, broken glass, wire, wood, plastic and paper, comment on the impact of human activity on habitat. The image of cocoon especially serves as metaphor for metamorphosis: the fragile and changing nature of our planet. “This is a show of faith in Nature’s evolutionary flexibility. It is art about hope and the power of transformation,” writes artist, Lloyd McMullen. For the fourth year in a row, Recology is sponsoring the green show, Changing Nature, as an Exhibit Underwriter.